Tag: Alzheimer’s association

tips to reduce stress

10 Tips for Managing Stress with Alzheimer’s

Living with Alzheimer’s or caring for loved ones with dementia brings demands and may feel overwhelming. Too much stress affects your health and ability to function. Follow these 10 tips shared by the Alzheimer’s Association to reduce stress and improve concentration and decision-making:

  1. Maintain a positive attitude.
  2. Acceptance is key–all you can control is how you react and adjust.
  3. People can’t help if they don’t know there is a problem–be honest and open with your feelings.
  4. Relax–taking time to breathe is so important.
  5. Get moving–exercise can help reduce stress.
  6. Take it one day at a time–if it’s not an emergency situation, do not turn it into one.
  7. Sleep is important–a good night’s rest keeps us functioning at our best.
  8. Incorporate stress management techniques into your life–be social and have fun!
  9. Eat a balanced, healthful diet full of fruits, vegetables, and water.
  10. Set realistic goals and go slow–life is not a race, rather, it is a journey.

Finding ways to reduce caregiver stress will help lessen the long-term emotional and physical toll of caregiving. If you need help, contact us for more resources. More tips and symptoms of stress are available at alz.org/help-support.

TDT article Alzheimers Caregiver Workshop

Alzheimer’s Caregiving Workshop in the News

TDT article Alzheimers Caregiver Workshop
Read the complete article at http://www.tdtnews.com.

Caregiving Tips for Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Thanks again to Delia Jervier from the Capital of Texas Chapter of the Alzheimer’s Association for visiting AAACT at Central Texas Council of Governments this past week. Jervier shared great insight on caregiving for dementia and Alzheimer’s patients. One point she discussed was that as loved ones digress, there is a tendency to revert to their native language, making communication with facility staff difficult. One example she gave was a Korean woman in Austin who had reverted to her native language and diet, making it impossible to find a care center for her.

Jervier also mentioned that although training is necessary for caregiving, it requires more hours of training to learn how to groom pets that it does to learn how to work with dementia patients.

“People who care for people with dementia don’t get an adequate amount of training for the type care needed by individuals with Alzheimer’s,” Jervier said.

Jervier also stressed that early diagnosis will help the individual with the disease to become more involved in the decision-making process. The 10 early signs of Alzheimer’s she shared include:

  1. Difficulty remembering things that just happened
  2. Inability to plan or solve problems
  3. Losing track of dates, seasons, and time
  4. Misplacing things
  5. Mood and personality changes
  6. Poor decision-making
  7. Struggling with conversations
  8. Trouble completing familiar tasks
  9. Vision problems
  10. Withdrawal from social or work activities

Thank you to Temple Daily Telegram for covering this workshop. To read the complete article, visit tdtnews.com.